Tuesday, December 14, 2010

The Guru of Laughter

In Quaker Meeting for Worship on First Days (Sundays), the elders, or people who carry responsibility for the meeting, sit on the facing benches. (Nowadays that's changed a bit, but anyway.) When I was a child, at our meeting the facing benches were at the front of the room.  On a raised bench in one particular spot, week in and week out, sat Dr. McP.    He was ancient. He never moved.

I thought he was dead.  The reason he was there seemed obvious to me.  Every First Day they'd cart him in and prop him up for all to see to remind us to take Meeting really, really seriously.

In Quaker Schools, regular Meeting for Worship is mandatory.  During one memorable 7th grade meeting, my friend L and I fell into laughing fits.  We were "eldered" out of the room and found to our dismay that life wasn't half so funny on the meetinghouse porch.

I'm not saying that letting 7th graders meeting-bust is a great idea, but what is it about religion that fosters such grave attitudes?  According to the New Yorker, the Buddha essentially disapproved of laughter because "the world is burning."  I've heard one or two church sermons where the minister went to some lengths to assert that "God does have a sense of humor." Which, if this were obvious, wouldn't need to be hammered from the pulpit, right?

Enter Dr. Madan Kataria, founder of a spiritual  movement called Laughter Yoga.  With a thousand-bazillion years of Indian religious tradition behind him, he has founded a new spirituality based entirely on the notion that laughter can heal--physically, emotionally, spiritually.  It's free, it's social, and it's (duh) fun.  No one will boot you out of one of his loose network of laughter clubs for falling-out-hilarity.   Dr. Kataria's goal is modest: To win a Nobel prize for creating a worldwide healing movement.  Being from India, it seems that the "guru" part of his calling is almost a given.

Medical science hasn't exactly jumped on the bandwagon, but medical science isn't exactly known for its sense of humor.  One thing we do know: There's no way science can call this stuff harmful.

It makes me think. No, actually, it makes me want to go find a rubber chicken and do something ridiculous.  I mean, life isn't always easy, is it? We can go on with our lives, which may or may not include: Daily/weekly Mass; church services; "quiet times"; keeping a guardian angel air freshener in the car; Bible study; no study; Freudian analysis; meet-a-friend-for-coffee analysis; meditation; Dharma talks; prayer before meals; prayer after meals; yoga; gym workouts; drum circles.  Etc.

But I for one am going to look for opportunities to laugh. Really laugh. Full-out, embarrassing, nose-snorting, tears-down-the-face laughter.  After all, one reason people make religion such a serious matter is that we take ourselves so darn seriously.

7 comments:

JRWilson said...

Great inspiration, Helen! I'd rather laugh til I cry, not cry til I laugh, but oh, well, I'll take positive hysteria anyway I can get it...

Helen said...

Hee, hee!

joannagnp said...

I want to see you with the nose snorting, (snot running) laughter. I am with you fer sher. It's more fun to laugh.
I think God has a sense of humor, look at us.

Helen said...

Wicked good point. LOOK at us.

Anonymous said...

Congressmen, in spite not having a sense of humor, their speeches are always good for a laugh.

HelenQP said...

That's why someone came up with the word "droll."

Catherine Stine said...

I wanna go to Laughter Club!